Video: Help I’m sewing a tailored jacket

- Video, work in progress

After doing a few fairly quick and easy makes lately I’m about to embark on a really time-consuming project again. It’s a project that has been on my bucket list for over a year and now I finally have lined up all the ducks in a row. I’m making a tailored jacket to precise, using a pattern from Burdastyle August 2017 issue.

 

I got my hands on a very fine British tweed from Croft Mills and some gorgeous notions too and I show you all the goods and my thoughts (and trepidations) about this project—I just really want to make this work!

 

If you have any tips on resources, books, e-courses and such I would love to know! I’m considering buying my first Craftsy class and I would love to hear any suggestions on which are the best ones, as they have several tailoring related classes.

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14 Comments

  • Reply
    Diana Voermans
    February 18, 2018 at 8:04 pm

    Hello Johanna, Nice to see you making something else then sporting attire 😜 I am making these kind of jackets for years (with varied results I must say). One little tip: I learned to make a mock-up of the desired pattern first by using the lining fabric for this. I cut the parts with quite a wide seam to be able to adjust widths and lengths and so on. Only after een thorough fitting and taking the adjustments to the pattern, I cut the outer material. I love both your chosen fabrics for your jacket. Best of luck with it! Greetings from the Netherlands

    • Reply
      Johanna
      February 19, 2018 at 6:49 am

      Thank you for the lining tip, I had forgotten about that. It is a great method for sure that I will employ. I am also cutting the pattern pieces in non-woven, fabric-like, paper so that I can do an initial fitting using the pattern pieces.

  • Reply
    Ashley
    February 18, 2018 at 8:51 pm

    If you really want to go all out, Vintage Couture Tailoring is excellent : http://www.vonnordheim.co.uk/education/publications/ . It is very clear and extremely detailed. There is a lot of hand sewing involved which is time-consuming but utterly absorbing and satisfying. Can’t recommend it highly enough! And, it isn’t even very pricey.
    Greetings also from the Netherlands

    • Reply
      Johanna
      February 19, 2018 at 6:52 am

      Thank you! It looks just like that sort of book that was missing in my sewing library! I just ordered it 🙂

  • Reply
    Adrianne
    February 19, 2018 at 1:49 pm

    Oh I can’t wait to see your finished jacket; the fabrics look divine! I read this blog post recently and you might find some of it useful!
    http://frame.bloglovin.com/?post=6166943493&blog=1912516&frame_type=none especially how the fabric is prepped.

    • Reply
      Johanna
      February 21, 2018 at 2:06 pm

      Thank you for the tip! That is some great prep

  • Reply
    Valerie
    February 19, 2018 at 1:56 pm

    Hi Johanna – I enjoy your blog very much keep up the good work.
    I am from the UK and can recommend the ALISON SMITHS courses on Craftsy STRUCTURE & SHAPE.
    Alison shows you Traditional Tailoring – Speed Tailoring and a Hybrid method of the two. She also includes lots of other useful information that I found invaluable when making my Tailored Jacket. It is then up to you to choose which method you go with. If you want to to make a Tailored Jacket then using this class is the way to go. Good luck.

    • Reply
      Johanna
      February 21, 2018 at 2:07 pm

      Thank you! I’ve heard so many say good things about Alison Smith and I have decided to get a Craftsy subscription now 🙂

    • Reply
      Valerie
      February 27, 2018 at 9:41 pm

      Hi Joanna I have made two Jackets using Alison,s Craftsy class and they both came out a wonderful fit and lovely tailored lines, Happy sewing. XX

  • Reply
    COREY
    February 20, 2018 at 3:23 am

    Enjoying your videos and your blog. I just purchased your book on active wear since I want to get into sewing more of it. Most of my garment sewing is doing alterations to existing rtw. I have a large fabric/wool supply and focused lately on sewing polar fleece activewear, some knits, jeans jeans and more jeans. (home dec, but we won’t talk about that). I am hoping your book will help me sew more active wear. I went thru your DVF dress experience and wish i could purchase that onion pattern. I have the butterick one but hate it, with a passion. I found the site for the onion pattern but have no clue how to get it. In lieu of that I might just try to draft my own pattern for the dress (for my mom to wear) Thank-you for all your video posts/blog and detailed tutorials and good luck with the jacket. If you stick to high end rtw manufacturing techniques and use fusible hair canvas and mold the material and canvas on a pressing ham you can build shape into the garment.

    • Reply
      Johanna
      February 21, 2018 at 2:10 pm

      Hi! Thank you for purchasing my book! Shame that Onion makes it so hard to order, I can buy the patterns locally in a store so have tried order from them. They are great with basics, similar to the Finish pattern magazine company Ottobre. And good point about a pressing ham, I don’t have one and will need go get one pronto!

  • Reply
    Shelia
    February 20, 2018 at 6:03 am

    I highly recommend Sandra Betzina’s Power Sewing website. She and Ron Collins have done several in-depth video series on the construction of tailored jackets. She has over 236 videos on all aspects of sewing. For each pattern she designs for Vogue she creates a detailed video on how to construct the garment. I have expanded my sewing IQ more in the past two years than I did in the previous 40 years.

    • Reply
      Johanna
      February 21, 2018 at 2:11 pm

      Thank you! I love Sandra Betzina’s books and had now idea she has so many videos. Will check them out for sure, she is so knowledgeable and every tip I’ve tried from her has been very helpful!

  • Reply
    Kerstin Shadbolt
    February 25, 2018 at 11:51 pm

    I can’t wait to see your finished jacket – particularly your method for making bound button holes.

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