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Top 10 Sewing Tools For Less Than $10

Great sewing tools doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, these cheap sewing tools will make a big difference to your sewing, while costing less than 10 dollars each. A pretty sweet deal, I’d say!

So lets take a look at my list if budget-friendly sewing tools for less than $10

This post contains Amazon affiliate links meaning I get a commission for qualifying purchases.

Awl

This is truly a wonderful tool that has so many uses when it comes to sewing. I have two; a smaller multi-purpose one (called a tailor’s awl) and a bigger awl that is great for piercing holes in denim and other sturdier materials.

Uses

Get

Seam Gauge

A seam gauge makes adding seam allowances and exact folding so much easier. Just make sure you don’t get a flimsy one where the adjustable slider doesn’t stay. Instead, I prefer a sturdy metal piece with different sized corners for easy measuring and marking. 

Uses

Get

The metal one that I have

Other metal versions

Hump-jumper

Having problems with uneven feeding and skipped stitches when sewing over bulky seams and layers? Use a hump-jumper to level your presser foot and those annoying problems will be solved in an instance. 

Uses

  • Topstitching
  • Hemming
  • Coverstitching over bulky seams
  • Sewing buttons (some versions work for this too)

Get

Watch video: How to perfect topstitching

Point turner

Getting a point turner has made it easier to create sharp corners, which is something many of us home sewists struggle with, especially when starting out.

Use

  • Shirt collars
  • Corners
  • Quilting
  • Pockets 
  • Temporary marking using the sharp tip

Get 

Buttonhole cutter

I can’t believe I didn’t invest in this brilliant tool sooner. It has made the somewhat fraught experience of opening buttonholes much more relaxing, and the actual holes look much better too compared to those done with a seam ripper.

Mine is 12 mm so even opening small holes is easy. And it’s cheap as well, so definitely a worthy purchase. 

Use

Get

Watch Video: Sewing Buttonholes A Step-by-Step Guide

Magnetic Pincushion

Another tool I didn’t understand what the fuss was about until I actually bought one. While a regular, soft, pincushion is great, there is something deeply satisfying about just dropping the pins towards the cushion, rather than having to insert them one by one.

But the biggest value isn’t the storage in my humble opinion. What I love the most it’s that it’s basically a pin hoover. I can just move the cushion over the floor or my sewing table, and voilà, all pins are back in their place. Such a rewarding feeling!

Get

Thread Snipper

Are you like me, i.e. prone to skimping on trimming the thread strands while sewing, only to end up with an unmanageable tangled mess later on. If so then this could be the tool that can help you form a better habit. I held on buying one for ages since it’s just a tiny scissor, right?

But now I’m a convert and make sure I always have it around when I’m sewing. I’m still not 100% good with my thread snipping, but at least this tool has made me better at it!

Use

  • To trim threads during and after sewing

Buy 

Basting Pen/Glue Stick

Making sure the fabric doesn’t move when sewing is a constant challenge, and while I’m a big fan of hand basting, I also like to use glue for a quicker way to achieve the same thing.

You can use a regular glue stick, but for just a little bit more money, why not try a basting pen? It has the perfect amount of glue and the small tip makes the application a non-messy process. 

Use

  • Waistbands
  • Knit projects
  • Quilting
  • Patch pockets
  • And lots of other uses

Get

Wonder Tape

Another great invention to keep the fabric in place and prevent it from slipping. Perfect when sewing knits and waistbands, among other things. And the best thing is that it washes away in water without leaving any residue.

I use the tape from Prym (Dritz) which is a great product, but I’ve had a few people telling me that tape from some other brands can get stuck in the needle. So read the reviews and ask around, so that you don’t end up with a bad product.

Use

  • Waistbands
  • Knits (I love it for collars and plackets when sewing cardigans and tops)
  • Hemming

Watch Videos:
8 Tips for sewing knits
How to hem knits on a regular sewing machine

Get 

Quilting bar guide/Seam ruler

Every time I talk about how great this tool is, I get a bunch of comments saying that they had no idea how to use it since they don’t quilt. Well, I don’t quilt either and in Sweden, it’s called a seam guide ruler, which better explain the versatility of this tool.

You just insert in the slot behind the presser foot, adjust the length and then you have a magic wand that will help you to sew straight and even. 

Use

Get

Watch Video: How to Sew Straight

Want to learn even more about these tools and see them in action?

Then watch this video where I share all my budget tool tips

Now over to you

I hope you found this list helpful, and maybe you’ve found a new tool worth getting since these are all pretty inexpensive tools, especially when you consider the value they provide.

And several, such as the metallic seam gauge, the awl and the quilt guide will likely last a lifetime of sewing, for less than $10!

So now I’m super curious to hear your thoughts and tips on inexpensive tools that have Sa real difference to your sewing!

3 Comments

  • Kathy
    September 8, 2020 at 4:24 pm

    Great list of tools.

    Reply
  • Victoria Strohmeyer
    September 25, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Thank you for your great tips and videos and reviews!
    Helpful for me as a quilter who is learning to make clothing.
    Keep sharing your excellent information!

    Reply
  • Sarah
    September 25, 2020 at 7:22 pm

    Thank you! Your videos are always great. My experience with Wonder Tape is that the regular ‘Dritz Wash Away Wonder Tape’ works very well. I got the Dritz Quilting version because it comes in a longer roll, and even though it also says ‘Wash Away’, it did NOT wash away. I have made a note to not use that one with knits!

    Reply

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